<p>I was wondering what kind of female black characters do people want to see more of? Like, them being soft or selfish?</p>

Black Girls & Women: Representation We Want

As a Black woman reader, I definitely want to see more soft Black girls and women in literature. Girls with their own self-interests (caring about oneself isn’t necessarily selfish) and not always someone else’s caregiver is great too.

Here’s my list!

More Black girls…

  • In love
  • With close family bonds and healthy relationships and support systems (that don’t require enduring abuse, fixing their partner, or overall emotional labor to earn domestic happiness)
  • Being protected
  • As main characters, heroines and anti-heroes
  • On adventures
  • In fantasy and magical settings
  • In historical settings as peasants, upper-class society, and royalty
  • Descriptions of Black Afro hair, skin, features as a normal thing in books (see this compilation) and not in an Othering way
  • On the other hand, vibrant, sometimes hyped up descriptions that allude to their beauty (see this ask. Or this one). Not Othering, just appreciating! 
  • Put us in fancy dresses and give us a sword and let us dance at the balls and have admirers!
  • Experiencing complex emotions not necessarily in reaction to racism or racist violence
  • On the book cover! And with an accurate, not light or white-washed model

~Mod Colette

Responses:

@madamef-er

  • Soft black girls and nerd girls who like cute things. 
  • Shy black girls not just in situations with boys. 
  • More lgbtqia+ black girls. Studs! Femmes! 
  • Gender fluid and non conforming constantly changing their style because they like it!
  • Spies and not just as the ‘sexy bait’ or ‘weapons master’ let us sit behind the computer for once and be hackers and stuff

@tanlefan

  • Black girls who are just…people.
  • I want a fantasy escapism adventure that isn’t a thinly veiled discussion on slavery or racism or any other aspect of The Struggle. I am tired. 
  • Can I just have a happy Black girl who believes in fairies or something?

@esmeraldanacho-1776
More autistic Black women/girls! I don’t care what genre really; just have them in there!

@briarsthicket
And enby black people!

@mattiekins

  • Def soft black girls. 
  • Energetic and playful. 
  • Or shy and quiet.
  • I want to see more black girls who are nerds and not just mommy mommying or nanny nannying everyone. 
  • I want black girls who want to be a ballerina, or a talk show host, or a game designer etc. 
  • I want a black girl who gets to be happy. 
  • Who doesn’t have to act older than she is and be the shoulder for everyone, always.

@xiiishadesofgrey

  • I want more black lady nerds, if we’re talking modern settings!  
  • More black ladies who have a sporty/playful nature! 
  • Who aren’t afraid to get dirty and make chaos, without being dirty or frowned upon!
  • Strange as it sounds coming from me, more black princesses! Brandy as Cinderella in the 90s was my first Cinderella, and I LOVE that.
  • Please, god, more black wlws.

@daintythoughtswritersblock

  • I want to see tropes exercised 
  • Black women of all shades and tones

@hazelnut4370

  • Tbh just fellow black people being happy, like I rarely see that,
  • Or enjoying hobbies

rivergoddessdream

  • Happily childless black women
  • Black women traveling the world
  • Fat black women in happy, healthy, poly relationships
  • Black cis and trans women having a true sisterhood
  • Autistic black women
  • Black women in period pieces that aren’t about slavery and don’t take place in the US
  • Black women thespians
  • Black women painters
  • Black women revolutionaries
  • Black women front and center in the narrative
  • Black women healers and storytellers
  • Non christian Black women stories
  • Black women rockers

#complicated black women characters #tell those stories

@missnancywrites

More Black Girls…

  • With diverse cultural and social backgrounds!
  • That are nerdy, girly, intelligent, ditzy, all the personality types that white girls in literature get!
  • That are fragile, shy or anxious. Almost every single black woman I’ve seen in media or otherwise are wise and adult. Let us be an absolute wreck, or an anxious mess!
  • In science! Characters like Shuri, Moon Girl and Iron Heart in Marvel revitalized me, cuz young black girls only get two types. Both these girls are in intellectual and in science, but have bery different personalities.
  • In interracial relationships, and not because they hate black men or something along those lines. They just happen to be dating outside their race, black women get hate for that in real life and it’s unfair. Let us have relationships outside our race! That said…
  • In platonic relationships with black men! I think that’s important, cuz I don’t often seen black solidarity unless it’s for the purpose of showing how diverse the writing is. Let them share interests, daily frustrations that they would only understand, but don’t force a romance.
  • In solid friendships with other black girls! For some reason, we’re pitted against in each other inside and outside of writing! Write some sweet wholesome friendship!
  • With different sexualities! Let there be some that are ace, others are gay, bi or pan! Just be sure you don’t sexualize them, or turn em into a robot.
  • •Who are dark-skinned! This can be seen a lot in tv or movies, but when you want a black girl in your stuff don’t just hire a light-skinned black girl or a biracial black girl. It’s not the same.
  • Who get to act their age! Black women have a long standing history of being adultified, starting from a very young age, and it’s extremely harmful. Little black girls can wear what they please, the problem is people sexualizing them. Let the teen black girl be a teenager, she can look out for her siblings but she isn’t the keepern the house or their lives. Young adult black girls are not ideal housewives or capable working machines, they mess up and mess around just as much as any young adult.
  • With mental/physical disabilities or illnesses. Alongside with being forced to be more mature than they are, disabilities/illnesses are never taken seriously and we’re forced to just deal with it. Having black girls who happen to have these issues, but also have a healthy support group is always good!

@ink-and-roses

  • Seen as beautiful and desirable and NOT in a hypersexualized way
  • Interracial relationships are wonderful because black girls are beautiful and lbr everybody sees it
  • Sensitive and allowed to feel something other than righteous anger
  • Some black girls are skinny! Some are big! Some are slim and some are curvy! There’s no mold!
  • Dark skinned!
  • A YA protagonist out to save the world from something other than racism
  • Superpowers or magic that doesn’t come from generational trauma or slavery
  • Black characters who support other black characters. None of this token crabs in a barrel business.
  • Black girl nerds and punks and goths exist. I promise.
  • And this may be a personal preference but I’m not against the idea of a damsel in distress. We are always being strong. Let her be soft and delicate and cared for. Let her be princess carried and rescued from the tower and the dragon.

[Note from Mod: It’s not just you! I love a Black damsel being saved and protected. What is progressive for one woman varies due to historical and present depictions and is why intersectionality in feminism is so important! -Colette]

@nightlyswordswoman

As a writer, I write a lot of my black female characters like this because I rarely ever see black women being represented in these ways! ESPECIALLY on the covers of books, unless the author themselves is a black woman and even then its rare. 

Too often black women are stereotyped as strong protector types that are always rough, tough, and don’t need anybody in books (and real life), when that’s honestly just dumb and inaccurate–black women are as vulnerable as anyone else (in some cases, even more vulnerable, but that’s another topic). 

So yeah, this list is 100% accurate and I encourage those who are interested in writing black female characters (whether you’re a black woman or not) to consider writing them like this, because the stereotype needs to die lol.

But wait, there’s more!

@just-a-swsh-fangirl 
As an anime fan I kinda want to see a white male protagonist be paired up (romantically) with a black female at the end of the series. It would make my black self happy to see a girl like me in an important role like that.

@tgingwe

  • Black girls in STEM, pleaaase
  • Black girls with ADHD, depression, and other mental health conditions! 
  • Black girls with supportive families! 
  • Pan black girls! 
  • African black girls, with cultures that impact their lives and with complex relationships between their specific identities/cultures and the idea of being perceived as just black outside of Africa! 
  • Happy Trans Black girls!

@starcrossedrose

  • Love triangles where a black character gets to be with the guy or girl in the end.
  • Love triangles revolving around a black character.
  • Black retellings of fairy tales
  • Black characters in royal positions (King, Queen, Princes, Princesses, etc.)

@superviza

  • soft,reserved,emotional,shy, spirited, spunky, bubbly, corny, weird black women
  • a black woman in a healthy relationship with a black man who has a healthy obsession with her
  • little black girls
  • modest black women
  • black women without a criminal to success backstory
  • black women they were raised in a healthy family with both black parents who are still living
  • black women in interracial relationships that aren’t necessarily white
  • no tokens, several black women together with no beef
  • black women in fantasy
  • black women in friendship with ppl of other races and ethnicities
  • black women who get to feel and express emotion with it being a threat

@sappho-of-etheria

  • Black girls who don’t live in the US
  • black girls who are daughters of immigrants and have complex relationships with both their homeland and the land their family is from
  • Black girls with healthy relationships with their parents
  • black girls who are indecisive about their lives and struggling to find their place in the world and the reason not being racism
  • LGBTQ+ black girls with families that accept them and celebrate them
  • More black witches/magic users who don’t fall in the magical negro type.
  • Quirky black girls who have endearing and unusual interests
  • Black girls who both love sterotypical and non-stereotypical black things
  • Black girls having supportive friendship groups and not being the one who constantly needs to support the others
  • Black girls saving the world
  • Black girls having a love interest who loves them and cherishes them not because they think they are weak but because they want them to be safe and happy
  • Black girls being the cherished love interest
  • Black girls being thought of the most gorgeous girl and not being overly sexualized
  • Black girls and their siblings/friends going to another world a la Chronicles of Narnia
  • Black girls being the chosen ones and saving the world
  • Black girls in medieval fantasy stories and not just being a slave or the handmaiden of the white princess
  • Black girs with different and complex relationships with their womanhood and how they express it
  • Black girls with different hair textures
  • But above all else I just want black girls to be able to have the same range in character as their white counterparts. I am tired of never being able to relate to characters that look like me

last updated: 6.28.2020

find the cost of your paper

Sep 13, Grand Remembrances

Today is Grandparents Day in the United States. Being a Grand is a special honor. I feel very blessed that my wife and I have two grandchildren. We were able to visit them today. Yes, we are still being cautious with the coronavirus, but we also find it very difficult to not see them when they live so close. So today we did drop by to visit Jacob (age 10) and Sophia (age 7) along with their parents. We brought donuts and caught up with them. Our grandchildren are still pretty young and this is a precious time in their lives – and ours!

I wish I had known my grandparents better. We never lived in the same place. Dad was a career Air Force pilot, so we moved around a lot. But we did get to see them once in a while when they would visit us, or we them.

A Plague of Giants

There are five known magical ‘kennings’ or types: air, water, fire, earth, and plants. Each nation specializes in of these kennings, and the magic influences the society. There’s a big pitfall with this diversity of ability and locale–not everyone gets along.

Enter the Hathrim giants, or ‘lavaborn’ whose kenning is fire. Where they live the trees that fuel their fire are long gone, but the giants are definitely not welcome anywhere else. They’re big, they’re violent, and they’re ruthless. When a volcano erupts and they are forced to evacuate, they take the opportunity to relocate. They don’t care that it’s in a place where they aren’t wanted.

I first read Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid books and loved them (also the quirky The Tales of Pell), so was curious about this new venture, starting with A PLAGUE OF GIANTS. Think Avatar: The Last Airbender meets Jim Butcher’s Codex Alera series. Elemental magic, a variety of races, different lands. And it’s all thrown at you from page one.

But this story is told a little differently. It starts at the end of the war, after a difficult victory, and a bard with earth kenning uses his magic to re-tell the story of the war to a city of refugees. And it’s this movement back and forth in time and between key players in this war that we get a singularly grand view of the war as a whole. Hearne uses this method to great effect.

There are so many interesting characters in this book that I can’t cover them all here. Often in books like this such a large cast of ‘main’ character can make the storytelling suffer, especially since they don’t have a lot of interaction with each other for the first 3/4 of the book–but it doesn’t suffer, thankfully. And the characterization is good enough, despite these short bursts, that by the end we understand these people and care about what happens to them.

If there were a main character it would be Dervan, a historian who is assigned to record (also spy on?) the bard’s stories. He finds himself caught up in machinations he feels unfit to survive. Fintan is the bard from another country, who at first is rather mysterious and his true personality is hidden by the stories he tells; it takes a while to understand him. Gorin Mogen is the leader of the Hathrim giants who decide to find a new land to settle. He’s hard to like, but as far as villains go, you understand his motivations and he can be even a little convincing. There’s Abhi, the son of hunters, who decides hunting isn’t the life for him–and unexpectedly finds himself on a quest for the sixth kenning. And Gondel Vedd, a scholar of linguistics who finds himself tasked with finding a way to communicate with a race of giants never seen before (definitely not Hathrim) and stumbles onto a mystery no one could have guessed: there may be a seventh kenning.

There are other characters, but what makes them all interesting is that they’re regular people (well, maybe not Gorin Mogen or the viceroy–he’s a piece of work) who become heroes in their own little ways, whether it’s the teenage girl who isn’t afraid to share vital information, to the scholars who suddenly find how crucial their minds are to the survival of a nation, to the humble public servants who find bravery when they need it most. This is a story of loss, love, redemption, courage, unity, and overcoming despair to not give up. All very human experiences by simple people who do extraordinary things.

Hearne’s worldbuilding is engaging. He doesn’t bottle feed you, at first it feels like drinking from a hydrant, but then you settle in and pick up things along the way. Then he shows you stuff with a punch to the gut. This is no fluffy world with simple magic without price. All the magic has a price, and more often than not it leads you straight to death’s door. For most people just the seeking of the magic will kill you. I particularly enjoyed the scenes with Ahbi and his discovery of the sixth kenning and everything associated with it. But giants? I mean, really? It isn’t bad enough fighting people who can control fire that you have to add that they’re twice the size of normal people? For Hearne if it’s war, the stakes are pretty high, and it gets ugly.

The benefit of the storytelling style is that the book, despite its length, moves along steadily (Hearne is no novice, here). The bits of story lead you along without annoying cliffhangers (mostly), and I never got bored with the switch between characters. It was easy to move between them, and they were recognizable enough that I got lost or confused. The end of the novel felt a little abrupt, but I guess that has more to do with I was ready for the story to continue, despite the exiting climax.

If you’re looking for epic fantasy with fun storytelling and clever worldbuilding, check out A PLAGUE OF GIANTS.

The post A Plague of Giants appeared first on Elitist Book Reviews.

The Artwork Of Gary Choo

Gary Choo is a concept artist/illustrator based in Singapore. I’ve know Gary for a good many years ( 17, actually ), working together in animation studios in Singapore like Silicon Illusions and Lucasfilm. Gary currently runs an art team at Mighty Bear Games, but when time allows he also draws covers for Marvel comics, and they’re amazing –

The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo

To see more of Gary’s work or to engage him for freelance work, head down to his ArtStation.

The post The Art Of Gary Choo appeared first on Halcyon Realms – Art Book Reviews – Anime, Manga, Film, Photography.

27