Discovering a new resource…

I had a busy, busy week, my first full one back in the library after 2½ months working from home, so yesterday morning I spent some time just cruising the Internet, with genealogy (surprise, surprise!) in mind. A question on a Facebook genealogy group (can’t remember which one at this point – I belong to so many), led me to the Pubwiki website (my 3rd-great-uncle, William, was a publican), which led me to the Londonwiki page which mentioned this directory: Robson’s London directory, street key, classification of trades, and Royal Court guide and peerage: particularizing the residences of 70,000 establishments in London and its environs, and fifteen thousand of the nobility and gentry, also an extensive conveyance list, alphabetical list of public carriers, together with the street guide. For 1842.

This caught my eye, as it’s one I hadn’t used before. Clicking through, I searched for New Compton Street, to see if my 3rd great-grandfather, John Taylor (he who married Sarah, whose marriage date I still seek), appeared. Lo and behold, he did – click the following link https://londonwiki.co.uk/streets1832/NewComptonstreet.shtml to see the full list of residents.

However, this search result is a transcription, not the original. I wondered if there was more information, so I googled the name of the directory, which took me to the Hathi Trust site. It’s one with which I’m already familiar, but until this point had only provided a place for me to lose myself, rather than somewhere to do serious research. If you don’t know about Hathi Trust, it’s “a not-for-profit collaborative of academic and research libraries preserving 17+ million digitized items. HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection.“[1] Some items are fully accessible to anyone, while others must be members of institutional libraries. The items are accessed through partner library sites.

Fortunately for me, this particular item is one of the former, which I learned from its catalogue record (click image to enlarge):

So I clicked through and began my search. At first I didn’t have a whole lot of luck, as I wasn’t using the search engine properly (bad librarian!), mostly because I was too excited and didn’t take the time to explore. I was getting far too many hits with both John and Taylor and Compton and New. Eventually I found the perfect search terms (click image to enlarge):

TaylorJohn_SearchResults_RobsonLondonDirectory1842_HT

I know that specific address from my 2nd great-grandfather’s baptismal record[2] along with subsequent census records, through until 1871.[3] From the search results I clicked through to the first match, where John Taylor appears as a Grindery Dealer[4] (click image to enlarge):

TaylorJohn_RobsonsDirectoryLondon_1842_p3_uc2.ark__13960_t9m32rx1b-1372-1591463850

Now that was a term I hadn’t heard before, so I googled it (naturally) and found the following definition: “Grindery Dealers Shop* A shop housing the business of a grindery dealer. grindery [sic] are the tools and materials used by shoemakers and other leather-workers.“[5]

That made sense, given that on the baptismal records of his children, John’s occupation appears as: shoemaker (1816,[6] 1819[7]) and grinder (1828)[8]. I have to admit, until this directory listing, I hadn’t taken much notice of the occupation on that final baptismal register entry, which just happens to be for my 2nd great-grandfather, Thomas. Lesson learned! Anyway, still very exciting.

On to the next entry – clearly John was also still active in his leather work as he is also listed in the Leather Cutters & Leather Sellers classification[9] (click image to enlarge):

TaylorJohn_RobsonsDirectoryLondon_1842_HT_p1&2_uc2.ark__13960_t9m32rx1b-1429-1591462970

Seeing his name and address there was so exciting! And I’m able to share this with you because, unlike the record images on Ancestry, which are protected by copyright and must not be shared as per the site’s Terms and Conditions, many of those on HathiTrust are in the public domain, as indicated when you click through to the item itself (click image to enlarge):

HathiTrust_DownloadOptions

 The Accessibility page referred to above defines Public Domain[10] (click url in caption)

 

HathiTrustPublicDomain
https://www.hathitrust.org/access_use#pd

The item screen capture also shows options for downloading either pages or the full document, depending on the licensing. You can see why this site is so useful to genealogists. Not only does it provide access to sources you wouldn’t find elsewhere, but it gives you options for capturing the information you discover.

Under Get this book, the first link is for Find in a library. This takes you to WorldCat, another incredibly useful tool. I turned to it for one of the similar items that appeared in the sidebar in the record for Robson’s London directory…, namely A pictorial and descriptive guide to London and its environs: together with a complete index to streets, public buildings, etc., which dates from the mid-1920s. Its catalogue record at HathiTrust did not include the Full View option, so I clicked on Find in a library, which took me directly to the search result there (click image to enlarge):

WorldCatSearchResult

Imagine my joy upon seeing that the second result was for the University of Alberta here in Canada. Yay! While ILL services are currently suspended because of the pandemic, I have saved the information from the U of A library website to give to my friend and colleague, Beth, who is the ILL specialist at the library where I work. It may not be till later this year that I get this book, but just knowing its a possibility is so exciting.

What else can HathiTrust do for you? It has far more than just books. Take, for instance, this map of London (click to see the full image) and its environs from 1818. For this post, I have split it and removed the middle because it’s quite large, but I wanted you to see the bottom of the map that has all kinds of extra information (click image to enlarge):

HathiTrust_MapImage_full

On top of all this, the website generates citations for its material (click image to enlarge):

HathiTrustCitation

has an Advanced Search feature (click image to enlarge):

HathiTrust_AdvSearch

allows you to delimit your results to drill down (click image to enlarge):

HathiTrust_LondonSearch_delimited

and, finally, if you log in as a guest (there are a variety of ways to do this), it gives you the option to create collections where you can save the items you use the most if you don’t want to download them (click image to enlarge):

HathiTrustNameCollection

While I have saved items to my collections, for anything absolutely vital, like John Taylor’s directory listings, I have made sure to save copies to my hard drive. Never, EVER assume that what appears at a website one day will be there the next. Anything can, and does, happen.

So, there you have it – another tool at your disposal. But, be warned, the right-hand sidebar with similar items to that in your search result will suck you in and spit you out several hours later! I was also going to show some of my workflow from the HT site, however, this post is already long enough – I’ll save that for next week. I am still working on my Hannah Izzard problem and hope to update that soon.

Have you discovered a new tool for your genealogy toolbox recently? If so, please add it in the comments 🙂

References

1. Hathi Trust Digital Library. “Welcome to HathiTrust!” HathiTrust Digital Library. Last modified n.d. Accessed June 7, 2020. https://www.hathitrust.org/about.

2. Baptisms (PR). England. St. Giles in the Fields, Holborn, Camden, Middlesex. 08 Jun 1828. Taylor, Thomas, son of John (grinder) and Sarah. Page: 20; Entry no.: 356. Board of Guardian Records and Church of England Parish Registers. London Metropolitan Archives, London; Reference No.: DL/T/036/060. Collection: London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917 image (#64 of 128). Ancestry (https://bit.ly/2XIw7cs : accessed 20 March 2020)

Baptisms (PR). England. St. Giles in the Fields, Holborn, Camden, Middlesex. 08 Jun 1828. Taylor, Thomas, b. 23 May 1828, son of John (knife-grinder) and Sarah. Page: 30; Entry no.: 356. Board of Guardian Records and Church of England Parish Registers. London Metropolitan Archives, London; Reference No.: P82/GIS/A/02. Collection: London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917 image (#17 of 506). Ancestry (https://ancstry.me/2UxcAsX : accessed 20 March 2020)

3. Census returns. England. St. Giles North, St. Giles in the Fields, Middlesex. 06 Jun 1841. Tailor [sic], John (age 50, leather gr). Class: HO107; Piece: 673; Book: 18; Civil Parish: St Giles in The Fields; County: Middlesex; Enumeration District: 8a; Folio: 57; Page: 19; Line: 08; GSU roll: 438789. Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841, TNA. Collection: 1841 England Census Image. Ancestry.ca (https://ancstry.me/3bk6Id8 : accessed 20 March 2020) Note: Address is 16 New Compton Street.

Census returns. England. St. Giles North, St. Giles in the Fields, Middlesex. 30 Mar 1851. Taylor, Thomas (age 22, machine ruler). Class: HO107; Piece: 1509; Enumeration District: 09; Folio: 365; Page: 68; Schedule: 355; Line: 12; GSU roll: 87843 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851, TNA. Collection: 1851 England Census Image. Ancestry.ca (https://bit.ly/3eVo164 : accessed 05 June 2019) Note: Address is 16 New Compton Street.

Census returns. England. St. Giles North, St. Giles in the Fields, Middlesex. 07 Apr 1861. Taylor, Thomas (age 32, account book ruler). Class: RG 9; Piece: 173; Enumeration District: 1; Folio: 7; Page: 11; Schedule No.: 75; Line: 15; GSU roll: 542586 Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861, TNA. Collection: 1861 England Census Image. Ancestry.ca (https://ancstry.me/2HWPKG8 : accessed 05 June 2019) Note: Address is 16 New Compton Street.

Census returns. England. St. Giles North, St. Giles in the Fields, Middlesex. 07 Apr 1871. Taylor, Thomas (age 42, machine ruler (unable to work)). Class: RG10; Piece: 351; Enumeration District: 9a; Folio: 35; Page: 63; Schedule No.: 397; Line: 12; GSU roll: 824608. Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871, TNA. Collection: 1871 England Census Image. Ancestry.ca (https://bit.ly/3h3KD6u : accessed 05 June 2019) Note: Address is 16 New Compton Street.

4. Directory entries. England. 1842. Taylor, John. In: Robson, William. Robson’s London Directory, Street Key, Classification of Trades, and Royal Court Guide and Peerage: Particularizing the Residences of 70,000 Establishments in London and Its Environs, and Fifteen Thousand of the Nobility and Gentry, Also an Extensive Conveyance List, Alphabetical List of Public Carriers, Together with the Street Guide. For 1842. London: Robson, 1842. Page: 1426. HathiTrust Digital Library. (https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/009262276 : accessed 06 June, 2020)

5. English, Heritage. “Glossary Search of Terms.” Take the TimeTrail (Warwickshire Museum). Last modified 1999. (https://timetrail.warwickshire.gov.uk/searchglossary.aspx?term=grindery : accessed June 6, 2020)

6. Baptisms (PR). England. St. Giles in the Fields, Holborn, Camden, Middlesex. 31 Jul 1816. Taylor, John, b. 10 Jul 1816, son of John (shoemaker) and Sarah. Page: 159; Entry no.: 700. Board of Guardian Records and Church of England Parish Registers. London Metropolitan Archives, London; Reference No.: DL/T/090/009. Collection: London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917 image (#159 of 210). Ancestry (https://bit.ly/2Y4hy1S : accessed 20 March 2020)

7. Baptisms (PR). England. St. Giles in the Fields, Holborn, Camden, Middlesex. 15 Feb 1819. Taylor, Sarah, b. 30 Jan 1819, son of John (shoemaker) and Sarah. Page: n.p.; Entry no.: 220. Board of Guardian Records and Church of England Parish Registers. London Metropolitan Archives, London; Reference No.: DL/T/090/012. Collection: London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917 image (#11 of 177). Ancestry (https://bit.ly/2Uizc0M : accessed 20 March 2020)

8. Op. cit., Baptism. Thomas Taylor, 08 Jun 1828. Ancestry.

9. Op. cit., Directory entry, John Taylor in Robson, William. Robson’s London Directory… 1842. Page: 1483.

10. Hathi Trust Digital Library. “Access and Use Policies.” HathiTrust Digital Library. Last modified n.d. Accessed June 6, 2020. https://www.hathitrust.org/access_use#pd.

find the cost of your paper

Sep 13, Grand Remembrances

Today is Grandparents Day in the United States. Being a Grand is a special honor. I feel very blessed that my wife and I have two grandchildren. We were able to visit them today. Yes, we are still being cautious with the coronavirus, but we also find it very difficult to not see them when they live so close. So today we did drop by to visit Jacob (age 10) and Sophia (age 7) along with their parents. We brought donuts and caught up with them. Our grandchildren are still pretty young and this is a precious time in their lives – and ours!

I wish I had known my grandparents better. We never lived in the same place. Dad was a career Air Force pilot, so we moved around a lot. But we did get to see them once in a while when they would visit us, or we them.

A Plague of Giants

There are five known magical ‘kennings’ or types: air, water, fire, earth, and plants. Each nation specializes in of these kennings, and the magic influences the society. There’s a big pitfall with this diversity of ability and locale–not everyone gets along.

Enter the Hathrim giants, or ‘lavaborn’ whose kenning is fire. Where they live the trees that fuel their fire are long gone, but the giants are definitely not welcome anywhere else. They’re big, they’re violent, and they’re ruthless. When a volcano erupts and they are forced to evacuate, they take the opportunity to relocate. They don’t care that it’s in a place where they aren’t wanted.

I first read Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid books and loved them (also the quirky The Tales of Pell), so was curious about this new venture, starting with A PLAGUE OF GIANTS. Think Avatar: The Last Airbender meets Jim Butcher’s Codex Alera series. Elemental magic, a variety of races, different lands. And it’s all thrown at you from page one.

But this story is told a little differently. It starts at the end of the war, after a difficult victory, and a bard with earth kenning uses his magic to re-tell the story of the war to a city of refugees. And it’s this movement back and forth in time and between key players in this war that we get a singularly grand view of the war as a whole. Hearne uses this method to great effect.

There are so many interesting characters in this book that I can’t cover them all here. Often in books like this such a large cast of ‘main’ character can make the storytelling suffer, especially since they don’t have a lot of interaction with each other for the first 3/4 of the book–but it doesn’t suffer, thankfully. And the characterization is good enough, despite these short bursts, that by the end we understand these people and care about what happens to them.

If there were a main character it would be Dervan, a historian who is assigned to record (also spy on?) the bard’s stories. He finds himself caught up in machinations he feels unfit to survive. Fintan is the bard from another country, who at first is rather mysterious and his true personality is hidden by the stories he tells; it takes a while to understand him. Gorin Mogen is the leader of the Hathrim giants who decide to find a new land to settle. He’s hard to like, but as far as villains go, you understand his motivations and he can be even a little convincing. There’s Abhi, the son of hunters, who decides hunting isn’t the life for him–and unexpectedly finds himself on a quest for the sixth kenning. And Gondel Vedd, a scholar of linguistics who finds himself tasked with finding a way to communicate with a race of giants never seen before (definitely not Hathrim) and stumbles onto a mystery no one could have guessed: there may be a seventh kenning.

There are other characters, but what makes them all interesting is that they’re regular people (well, maybe not Gorin Mogen or the viceroy–he’s a piece of work) who become heroes in their own little ways, whether it’s the teenage girl who isn’t afraid to share vital information, to the scholars who suddenly find how crucial their minds are to the survival of a nation, to the humble public servants who find bravery when they need it most. This is a story of loss, love, redemption, courage, unity, and overcoming despair to not give up. All very human experiences by simple people who do extraordinary things.

Hearne’s worldbuilding is engaging. He doesn’t bottle feed you, at first it feels like drinking from a hydrant, but then you settle in and pick up things along the way. Then he shows you stuff with a punch to the gut. This is no fluffy world with simple magic without price. All the magic has a price, and more often than not it leads you straight to death’s door. For most people just the seeking of the magic will kill you. I particularly enjoyed the scenes with Ahbi and his discovery of the sixth kenning and everything associated with it. But giants? I mean, really? It isn’t bad enough fighting people who can control fire that you have to add that they’re twice the size of normal people? For Hearne if it’s war, the stakes are pretty high, and it gets ugly.

The benefit of the storytelling style is that the book, despite its length, moves along steadily (Hearne is no novice, here). The bits of story lead you along without annoying cliffhangers (mostly), and I never got bored with the switch between characters. It was easy to move between them, and they were recognizable enough that I got lost or confused. The end of the novel felt a little abrupt, but I guess that has more to do with I was ready for the story to continue, despite the exiting climax.

If you’re looking for epic fantasy with fun storytelling and clever worldbuilding, check out A PLAGUE OF GIANTS.

The post A Plague of Giants appeared first on Elitist Book Reviews.

The Artwork Of Gary Choo

Gary Choo is a concept artist/illustrator based in Singapore. I’ve know Gary for a good many years ( 17, actually ), working together in animation studios in Singapore like Silicon Illusions and Lucasfilm. Gary currently runs an art team at Mighty Bear Games, but when time allows he also draws covers for Marvel comics, and they’re amazing –

The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo
The Art Of Gary Choo

To see more of Gary’s work or to engage him for freelance work, head down to his ArtStation.

The post The Art Of Gary Choo appeared first on Halcyon Realms – Art Book Reviews – Anime, Manga, Film, Photography.

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